Digitisation removes the key pain points of air cargo charter

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CharterSync


CharterSync, which celebrated three years of disruptive digitisation earlier in 2022, has truly embraced the ability of technological innovation to transform the charter sector into a more effective and efficient industry.

“Charter is often the best option for critical supply chains in which time is a significant determinant of cost. Charter brokers need to be able to provide freight forwarders with greater speed and flexibility than they would be able to have through any other method,” Ed Gillett, co-founder and director of Charter- Sync, said.

CharterSync’s technology works to make the process faster than ever before, through enhanced visibility of available aircraft, sharing charter quotes within minutes and providing customer service at every step of the way to keep the whole system moving as smooth as possible.

“It’s about recognising a forwarder’s needs – some just need access to our technology in order to speed up their supply chains while others really benefit from specialised support from a charter sales executive dedicated to their account. Our job is to create a solution that fits their needs using the right combination of tech and human touch,” Gillett added.

Read more: CharterSync: Open your doors to students to tackle industry recruitment crisis

CharterSync has styled itself as a “dig- ital charter brokerage for the air cargo charter market,” providing an online app that matches freight forwarders with the most appropriate operators and aircraft from any- where in the world based on factors such as budget, speed, cargo size, pick-up/drop off, fuel consumption, sustainability and more.

“Digitisation has removed many of the key pain points of air cargo charter, making the industry more agile and responsive, and simplifying and accelerating the booking process. The increased choice and number of charter solutions available through our platform has empowered forwarders and

has enabled them to consider more options than they might otherwise have been provid- ed with through traditional means,” Gillett stated.

Read more: CharterSync celebrates three years of “disruptive digitisation” in air cargo charter

Bringing technology into outdated sec- tors of a fragmented and global industry has presented some challenges for CharterSync. “The air cargo charter industry had been well behind the curve in embracing the benefits of digital transformation, so it has been a challenge to innovate a whole sector and dis- rupt the status quo,” Gillett admitted.

However, the impact of the pandemic on the sector in the past couple of years has helped CharterSync to “demonstrate the real value and benefits of automating the booking process.” Gillett highlighted how, in recent times, the company has “found that larger freight forwarding companies have be- come much more willing to consider charter as an option alongside scheduled services.”

As with other industries, the air cargo sec- tor has been impacted by a string of global challenges. “Slowed economic growth in China has taken its toll, while sanctions, man- ufacturing, supply chain issues and inflation have all impacted the global goods trade,” Gillett admitted, while “congestion and ground handling staff shortages at key air cargo hubs, as well as current strike action at vital ports in the UK, continue to pile pressure on the air cargo industry.”

Despite these challenges, Gillett remains optimistic about the continued boom in the charter business. “The air cargo industry has shown real resilience over the past two years, and I believe, can look forward to stabilising in 2023,” he said, “With our own volumes on course to treble for 2022, and growing interest from North America, the Far East, and South America, we are confident that CharterSync’s growth trajectory will continue – even in the face of inflation and economic downturn.”