Strong start to 2022 for CharterSync

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Digital air cargo charter business CharterSync says it is eyeing “global expansion” in 2022 after achieving unprecedented growth in Q4 2021.

Against the slowing air cargo market growth in Q4 2021, CharterSync’s operating profit was up 260% compared to the three previous quarters combined. The online broker says 2022 has started off even more robustly, with the month of January delivering the same level of sales as the whole of 2021.

Building on this success, the company will launch a complete rewrite of its digital charter platform in the coming months, as reported previously by ACW. The new system will equip CharterSync for global expansion by offering freight forwarders infinitely flexible cargo charter options for all kinds of cargo on any type of aircraft, airline operator or global routing.

Simon Watson, co-founder and director of CharterSync, says: “CharterSync’s speed, efficiency and value proposition has disrupted and transformed the air cargo charter market, which continues to combat supply chain disruption and air cargo capacity constraints. The global rollout of our platform will introduce new customers around the world to the game-changing speed, simplicity and flexibility of CharterSync’s booking process. We anticipate growing our client base by at least 75% in 2022, with particularly strong growth in Asia-Pacific and North America, where there is an increasing modal shift from ocean shipping to avoid congestion and to move goods faster.”

CharterSync’s growth has been fuelled by high demand for PPE, syringes, Covid-19 test kits boosted by the arrival of the Omicron variant, and the ongoing UK vaccination programme, all helping to strengthen 2021 air cargo volumes by 19% year-on-year.

CharterSync also capitalised on growth in the oil and gas sector which has seen a resurgence thanks to strengthening global demand for oil and natural gas.

Faced with heightened demand, CharterSync alleviated capacity pressures at major hubs by the increased use of regional airports such as Bournemouth, and the deployment of preighters to complement traditional cargo craft.